Father and son sitting by the water.

How to Master the Art of Listening

How to Master the Art of Listening

How to Master the Art of Listening

How to Master the Art of Listening

How to Master the Art of Listening

How to Master the Art of Listening

How to Master the Art of Listening

How to Master the Art of Listening

How to Master the Art of Listening

Empathic listening is the one practice upon which all parenting successes and failures rest. If we are to parent well, we must improve our ability to listen.

Stephen R. Covey explains empathic listening in his book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.  Empathic listeners “seek first to understand, then to be understood.”

Next to physical survival, the greatest need of a human being is psychological survival—to be understood, to be affirmed, to be validated, to be appreciated.” ~ Stephen R. Covey

Many people view themselves as good listeners. This is a listening myth.

I was one of those people. I thought I listened to my kids. I’m guessing my kids would have said otherwise. Over the last decade, I’ve intentionally practiced empathic listening, which resulted in improved relationships and increased trust.

We build trust by working on things we have control over, like our attitude, responses, and habits.

It is impossible to build and maintain trust without empathic listening. 

When you listen with empathy to another person, you give that person psychological air. And after that vital need is met, you can then focus on influencing or problem solving.” ~ Stephen R. Covey

When I first heard about empathic listening, I thought it was more like active listening. You know, the skills we’ve heard are so important, like eye contact, nodding to show interest, and leaning in. While these skills are important, they only scratch the surface of what it means to listen empathically.

When another person speaks, we’re usually ‘listening’ at one of four levels. We may be ignoring another person, not really listening at all. We may practice pretending. “Yeah. Uh-huh. Right.” We may practice selective listening, hearing only certain parts of the conversation. We often do this when we’re listening to the constant chatter of a preschool child. Or we may even practice attentive listening, paying attention and focusing energy on the words that are being said.”

For me, when I focus a lot on the words people say and my response, which is listening with the intent to reply. It’s hard for me to turn off the “what can I say to sound witty and wise?” chatter.

What is empathic listening?

Empathic listening is about…

1) Listening until the other person feels understood.
2) Listening for feeling and meaning behind the words.
3) Staying present and allowing space to finish thoughts.
4) Remaining curious and not pre-determining others’ feelings.

Empathic listening is a gift. While it can be uncomfortable and challenging, it is the most important thing a parent can do to build trust and show unconditional love to a child.

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